Shrimad Bhagavad Gita

Loading...

Take Surveys For Cash

Take Surveys For Cash

Saturday, September 9, 2017

The Secret of Karma Yoga

By  
A very interesting event in the life of Ramana maharishi, the Sage of Thiruvannamalai has explained about the nishkama karma or the action without expecting the fruit there of.
The event was recorded by S Venkataramaiah on a Christmas day, 25th December, 1935.
Mr Rangachari, a Telugu Pundit in Voorhee's College at Vellore, India, asked about nishkama karma or unselfish action. There was no reply from the sage. After a time Ramana maharishi (Sage Ramana) went up the hill and a few followed him, including the pundit. There was a thorny stick lying on the way which Ramana picked up; he sat down and began leisurely to work at it. The thorns were cut off, the knots were made smooth, and the whole stick was polished with a rough leaf. The whole operation took about six hours. Everyone was wondering at the fine appearance of the stick made of a spiky material. A shepherd boy put in his appearance on the way as the group moved off. He had lost his stick and was at a loss. Ramana maharishi immediately gave the new one in his hand to the boy and passed on.
The pundit said that this was the matter-of-fact answer to his question.
What an unselfish action! The sage handed over the polished stick to a shepherd boy. He expected nothing in return.
Ramana said: "Karma Yoga or the Yoga of action is that yoga in which the person does not arrogate to himself the function of being the actor"
According to the Karma Yoga the actions go automatically. Action without the sense of doership is Karma Yoga!
Bhagavat Gita teaches active life from beginning to end.
Skill in action lies in the practice of Karma yoga.
Lord Krishna declares:" Your right is to work only, but never to the fruit thereof. Be not instrumental in making your actions bear fruit, nor let your attachment be to inaction."
Man has a right to action alone, not to the renunciation of action. One has to work according to his will without expecting the fruits thereof.
One who learns this secret is a real karma yogi.
S Nagarajan is a vehicle body engineer by profession. He has written more than 1300 articles in 16 magazines and published 18 books. He is revealing Eastern Secret Wisdom through T.V. Programmes, magazine articles, seminars, courses. His email address is: snagarajans@gmail.com. His articles on Yoga, laughter, efficacy of mantras and sound, Hypnotism, Tele Kinesis, Power of Prayer, Auto suggestion, Success Formula etc are regularly appearing in ezinearticles.com




Purpose of Human Existence As Explained in the Mahabharata

By  

Human life is a rare gift of God. By entering a human body, the soul gets a much sought after chance of becoming liberated from the cycle of birth and rebirth. Gods never die; hence, they never get the chance of being liberated. Their souls cannot merge with the Almighty Soul. It is only Nara (Human Soul) that can merge into Narayana (Almighty Soul). Hence, Gods and all celestial beings consider a human birth as highly fortunate.
The purpose of human existence is to free the soul from the bondage of birth and rebirth, with the help of the human body, mind and the grace of God.
The human body and mind should be cultivated in such a manner that right thoughts come, right words are spoken, right actions are performed, and right results are obtained, all leading to the liberation of the soul.
Sri Krishna explains to Arjuna how a soul can be liberated. The Bhagavat Gita is a song of the Almighty Soul. Grandsire Bhishma instructs Yudhishthira at the end of the battle, how simply a bath in the holy Ganga with a pure heart can liberate the soul. Rishi Veda Vyasa also instructs Yudhishthira that a human should always follow the path of Dharma only and then the soul can be easily freed. Scriptures give numerous guidelines how to conduct one's affairs towards this aim.
A human being is born alone and dies alone. However, while he is alive then knowledge is the best companion, his virtue is the best guide, his health is the best profit, his contentment is the best happiness, his anger is the worst enemy, his covetousness is the worst disease, his charity is the best glory, his equanimity in all circumstances is the best wealth, and his strict adherence to Dharma is the best destiny.
Vidura, the youngest brother and the prime minister of King Dhritrashtra, counseled him how a ruler can obtain liberation of his soul by performing his royal duties. Vidura states that a ruler should aspire for higher ideals and he should have forbearance, exertion and steadiness in virtue. He should carry out such duties that are within his capacity. He should not disclose his plans until they fructify. He should not be affected by honours or slights. A weapon and poison can kill one man, but wicked counsel can destroy an entire empire. Thus, the ruler should steadfastly practice virtue as it brings discrimination to arrive at the right decisions. A king should never keep company with people of low character, who procrastinate, who are stupid, pompous, or deceitful. He should avoid anger, excessive sleep, excessive sexual relations, fear, arrogance, and self-pride. His countenance should be as befitting a king, yet he should practice asceticism, self-restraint, and should give gifts of food and gold. However, in spite of hearing the scriptures, a ruler does not mend his evil ways, then he is doomed and the scriptures merely remain books that are only referred for the purposes of religious ceremonies.
Vidura tried his best to explain to King Dhritrashtra, but destiny had willed otherwise and King Dhritrashtra failed to act according to the laid down rules of the scriptures. For a foolish man, a scripture remains a closed book. Dhritrashtra had the opportunity of attaining salvation by discharging his royal duties according to Dharma, yet he failed because he could not conquer his love for his son and his throne. King Dhritrashtra always remained in the side of Adharma, due to which ultimately he lost both his beloved son and his much cherished throne.
Rajen Jani is a professional freelance writer with 18+ years of experience.
http://rajenjani.wordpress.com/
http://www.rajenjani.com/

Courage to Bear Pain and Sorrow As Shown in the Mahabharata

By  

The Mahabharata skillfully shows how to courageously bear pain and sorrow, in order to rise above both. As gold is made only after it has gone through intense heat, similarly human beings are perfected only after they have gone through intense pain and sorrow. However, if pain and sorrow is not borne with courage and fortitude, then it festers and rots the mind with jealousy, anger, and frustrates the senses into doing evil and wicked acts. Due to his blindness, Dhritrashtra could not become King of Hastinapura, although he was the eldest son. This pained Dhritrashtra and he was forever jealous of his younger brother Pandu, who was made the king.
Dhritrashtra could not bear this pain courageously. Thus, he was seized with anger and jealousy for the Pandavas. His pain was imbibed in Duryodhana and his other sons, who all remained enemies of the Pandavas from the very beginning. However, on the other hand, the Pandavas were also subject to numerous griefs, but they came through all the pains, because they bore them with courage and always remained on the path of Dharma. Duryodhana had them burned alive in a palace made of lac and other inflammable materials. Due to Vidura's intelligence, they escaped through a tunnel, unhurt. Thereafter, they spent many years in the forest and suffered many unsavory events. However, in the end, due to their faith in Dharma they rose above all their trials and tribulations.
At the beginning of the battle, Arjuna is overcome with grief when he sees his brothers, relatives, and teachers on both sides. In despondency, his Gandiva (bow) drops from his hand and he sits down in his chariot unable to fight. At this time, Sri Krishna delivers his heavenly discourse, the song celestial - "Bhagavat Gita", which raises Arjuna from his grief and he resolves to fight. At the end of Mahabharata, Yudhishthira is again grieved and wishes to resort to a fast unto death, as he felt that principally he was responsible for this great tragedy. Rishi Veda Vyasa consoles Yudhishthira that old age and death shadows an individual from the very moment of birth. These were the facts of life and hence there was no reason to grieve. The relatives, teachers, and friends had all taken part in a just war and their deaths came due to their own karmas (actions), and in no way can Yudhishthira be held responsible for this tragedy. Sorrow and joy are bound to alternate in life, and one should always remain on the path of Dharma under all circumstances. Rishi Veda Vyasa told Yudhishthira to let go of his grief and rule the kingdom as per the dictates of Dharma and Satya.
Rajen Jani is a professional freelance writer with 18+ years of experience.


Lord Krishna and Bhagavat Gita

By  

The Kurukshetra war is supposed to the most important war in Hindu mythology. It was in this war, Lord Krishna, leaving his army to Kaurava side, became the charioteer of Prince Arjuna. He had given the option of choosing either him or his huge army, to both Pandavas and Kauravas. It was Arjuna who chose him and his army was chosen by Duryodhana. In this war Lord Krishna advises Arjuna and revealed the truths about life. These insights were collectively known as Bhagavat Gita.
Bhagavat Gita
Gita contains advises, which Krishna gives Arjuna after seeing his dilemmas and confusions on fighting the war with his cousins, teachers, elders and friends. Krishna explains to him the duties of a warrior, a prince, about his karma and dharma in life. The spiritual text contains many philosophies, analogies and examples. It is in Kurukshetra war that Lord Krishna reveals his identity as the supreme God by displaying his Vishwarupa. Krishna tells Arjuna that Kurukshetra war is a Dharma Yudha, meaning a war to let Dharma prevail.
The five main truths of live, as described in Gita, are Ishwara, Prakriti, Kaala, Dharma and Jiva. Ishwara means the supreme controller of this universe. Prakriti is the basic nature of intelligence by which the universe functions. It is the base on which the works of creation is done. Kaala is referred to time or the age. Dharma is the law of nature, which binds all the forces together.
Gita basically give emphasis on the idea that one has to grow beyond the physical limitations of self and identify oneself with the eternal soul. Bhagavat Gita is a part of the Hindu epic Mahabharata and it contains a total of 700 verses.
Important Verses
One of the most important verses in Gita is 'Yada Yada Hi Dharmasya...Srijamyaham'. Through these lines Lord Krishna assures Arjuna that when the world becomes a playground of Adharma and Dharma is not at all protected, then he will take birth again and protect the world from evil forces. Another verse 'Paritranaya Sadhunam...Yuge Yuge' also holds important meaning. In order to protect the sages from evil forces, to kill evil forces and to make Dharma prevail in the world, Lord Krishna will take birth again in all the ages.
Apart from Arjuna, Gita was also heard by Sanjaya - the associate of Dhritarashtra (who is blind) - to whom Veda Vyasa had given the power of Divya Drishti, to see the war completely. Lord Hanuman and Barbarika, Ghatotkacha's son were also recipients of these insights.
Gita is also known as Gitopanishad, suggesting that this Holy Scripture is equal to an Upanishad. But as it has the summary of teachings of all the Upanishads, it is also known as Upanishad of the Upanishads.
To find out more about Hanuman chalisa text [http://www.prabhubhakti.com/wiki/hanuman-chalisa] and get more info on Hindu Gods like Krishna [http://www.prabhubhakti.com/wiki/krishna], go to Prabhubhakti.


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

God Has Never Broken Any Promise Ever Spoken! By Santhanam Nagarajan

There is a wonderful inscription to be found on a slab in a cathedral of Lubeck in Germany.
The inscription declares:
Ye call Me Master, and obey Me not,
Ye call Me Way, and walk Me not,
Ye call Me wise, and follow Me not,
Ye call Me Fair, and love Me not,
Ye call Me Rich, and ask Me not,
Ye call Me Eternal, and seek Me not,
Ye call Me Gracious, and trust Me not,
Ye call Me Noble, and serve Me not,
Ye call Me Mighty, and honor Me not,
Ye call Me Just, and fear Me not,
If I condemn You, blame Me not.
The words are meaningful.
In Bhagavat Gita Lord Krishna declares to Arjuna: "O, Arjuna, whenever righteousness is on decline, and unrighteousness is in the ascendant, then I body Myself forth."
"For the protection of the virtuous, for the extirpation of evil-doers, and for establishing righteousness on a firm footing, I am born from age to age" (Gita chapter four, verses 8 and 9)
The Lord awakens in the minds of the people faith in and reverence for the Vedas and other sacred scriptures, the other world, saints and God by carrying out the injunctions of the scriptures in His own personal life,and demonstrating the glory of righteousness by the use of His inspiring and powerful words and messages, and developing among the people a natural love and reverence for virtues and right conduct, makes them strongly cling to them.
He always protect the virtuous, destruct the evil-doers and establish the righteousness.
He reveals a simple way for salvation.
Lord Krishna says to Arjuna: " Resigning all your duties to Me, the all-powerful and all-supporting Lord, take refuge in Me alone. I shall absolve you of all sins, worry not" (Gita chapter 18, verse 66)
Krishna thus concludes his teaching of the Gita by giving a promise to the entire mankind.
Calling Him the Way and walking in that Way is left to us.
And God has never broken any promise ever spoken.
S.Nagarajan is a vehicle body engineer by profession. He has written more than 1300 articles in 16 magazines and published 18 books so far. He is revealing Eastern Secret Wisdom through T.V.Programmes, magazine articles, seminars, courses. His email address is : snagarajans@gmail.com. He has written a number of articles in ezinearticles.com


The Glory of Bhagavat Gita - Part I By Santhanam Nagarajan

The Mahabharata says: "The Gita comprises all the scriptures".
The Gita is the essence of all the Hindu scriptures.
Swami Ramatirtha narrates how Emerson has recommended very strongly the study of Gita. He writes:
"Mr. Mallory, a great personal friend of Emerson told Rama as to how Emerson had strongly recommended to him the study of the Bhagavat Gita and lent him a copy for just three weeks claiming that that was the first copy brought into America. It cost Emerson a full pound, 5 dollars! It is translated by Sir Charles Welkins with an introduction by Warren Hastings."
This copy is still in the Boston Public Library.
Special attention was drawn by Emerson to the translation of the verse 'mayi sarvamidam proktha' etc."
The Gita consists of 700 verses.
The number of verses attributed to the various characters figuring in the Gita in order of the chapters will be as follows:
1) Dhrtharastra Chapter one - one verse
2) Sanjaya Chapter one - 25 verses, two - 3, eleven - 8, eighteen - 5 (Total 41 verses)
3) Arjuna Chapter one - 21 verses, two - 6, three - 3 verses, four - 1,five - 1 verse, six - 5 verses, eight - 2, ten - 7, eleven - 33, twelve - 1, fourteen - 1, seventeen - 1, eighteen - 2 (Total 84 verses)
4) Lord Krishna Chapter two - 63 verses, three - 40 verses, four - 41, five - 28, six - 42, seven - 30, eight - 26, nine - 34, ten - 35, eleven - 14, twelve - 19, thirteen - 34, fourteen - 26, fifteen - 20, sixteen - 24, seventeen - 27, eighteen - 71 (Total 574 verses)
The chapter wise verses will be as follows:
Chapter one - 47 verses, two - 72, three - 43, four - 42, five - 29, six - 47, seven - 30, eight - 28, nine - 34, ten - 42, eleven - 55, twelve - 20, thirteen - 34, fourteen - 27, fifteen - 20, sixteen - 24, seventeen - 28, eighteen - 78 verses (Total 700 verses)
It is highly recommended that those who are spiritually inclined should read the Gita.
Every verse spoken by the Lord is beautiful and has pregnant meaning in it.
Lord Krishna reveals himself in the tenth chapter which is named as Vibhuti yoga (The yoga of Divine manifestations).
Lord Krishna says to Arjuna:
"Neither gods nor the great sage know the secret of My birth ( that is, My appearance in human or other garb out of mere sport); for I am the prime cause in all respects of gods as well as of the great seers.
He who knows Me in reality as birth less and without beginning, and as the supreme Lord of the Universe, he, undeluded among men, is purged of all sins.
Reason, right knowledge, unclouded understanding, forbearance, veracity, control over the senses and mind, joy and sorrow, evolution and dissolution, fear and fearlessness, non-violence equanimity, contentment, austerity, charity, fame and obloquy, - these diverse traits of creatures emanate from Me alone."
Those who read Gita will march forward in his/her spiritual path. There is no doubt in it
S. Nagarajan is a vehicle body engineer by profession. He has written more than 3000 articles in 18 magazines and published 52 books. He is revealing Eastern Secret Wisdom through T.V. Programmes, magazine articles, seminars, courses. His articles on Yoga, laughter, efficacy of mantras and sound, Hypnotism, Tele Kinesis, Power of Prayer, Vastu and Feng Shui, Auto suggestion, Success Formula, Out of Body Experience etc are regularly appearing in EzineArticles.com.


Lord Krishna and Bhagavat Gita By Kevin Fernandez

The Kurukshetra war is supposed to the most important war in Hindu mythology. It was in this war, Lord Krishna, leaving his army to Kaurava side, became the charioteer of Prince Arjuna. He had given the option of choosing either him or his huge army, to both Pandavas and Kauravas. It was Arjuna who chose him and his army was chosen by Duryodhana. In this war Lord Krishna advises Arjuna and revealed the truths about life. These insights were collectively known as Bhagavat Gita.
Bhagavat Gita
Gita contains advises, which Krishna gives Arjuna after seeing his dilemmas and confusions on fighting the war with his cousins, teachers, elders and friends. Krishna explains to him the duties of a warrior, a prince, about his karma and dharma in life. The spiritual text contains many philosophies, analogies and examples. It is in Kurukshetra war that Lord Krishna reveals his identity as the supreme God by displaying his Vishwarupa. Krishna tells Arjuna that Kurukshetra war is a Dharma Yudha, meaning a war to let Dharma prevail.
The five main truths of live, as described in Gita, are Ishwara, Prakriti, Kaala, Dharma and Jiva. Ishwara means the supreme controller of this universe. Prakriti is the basic nature of intelligence by which the universe functions. It is the base on which the works of creation is done. Kaala is referred to time or the age. Dharma is the law of nature, which binds all the forces together.
Gita basically give emphasis on the idea that one has to grow beyond the physical limitations of self and identify oneself with the eternal soul. Bhagavat Gita is a part of the Hindu epic Mahabharata and it contains a total of 700 verses.
Important Verses
One of the most important verses in Gita is 'Yada Yada Hi Dharmasya...Srijamyaham'. Through these lines Lord Krishna assures Arjuna that when the world becomes a playground of Adharma and Dharma is not at all protected, then he will take birth again and protect the world from evil forces. Another verse 'Paritranaya Sadhunam...Yuge Yuge' also holds important meaning. In order to protect the sages from evil forces, to kill evil forces and to make Dharma prevail in the world, Lord Krishna will take birth again in all the ages.
Apart from Arjuna, Gita was also heard by Sanjaya - the associate of Dhritarashtra (who is blind) - to whom Veda Vyasa had given the power of Divya Drishti, to see the war completely. Lord Hanuman and Barbarika, Ghatotkacha's son were also recipients of these insights.
Gita is also known as Gitopanishad, suggesting that this Holy Scripture is equal to an Upanishad. But as it has the summary of teachings of all the Upanishads, it is also known as Upanishad of the Upanishads.
To find out more about Hanuman chalisa text [http://www.prabhubhakti.com/wiki/hanuman-chalisa] and get more info on Hindu Gods like Krishna [http://www.prabhubhakti.com/wiki/krishna], go to Prabhubhakti.